Finally getting round to producing at 26.

Apr 9, 2012

  1. Sal_Paradise

    Sal_Paradise
    640 posts
    Since Sep 13, 2009
    Finally getting round to producing at 26. Got some money in the bank, and looking to get into my own flat the next few weeks

    My set up is going to be

    Ableton
    Krks
    Maschine
    Ipad
    Apc 40
    M-audio ozonic
    Mac book

    Traktor kontrol s4

    Any other recommendations for a start up studio?

    Can't help buy feel I've left it too late to start learning, but I've been using ableton to dj for a while, so not necessary starting for the bottom.
  2. mr meh

    mr meh
    565 posts
    Since Jan 10, 2011
    Looks good, but your gonna need an audio interface too.
  3. imPray

    imPray
    192 posts
    Since Dec 26, 2010
  4. micblack194

    micblack194
    367 posts
    Since Jan 1, 2008
    seems good enough now get producing, add stuff as you get better, learn what you have sitting around first, :twothumbs: i have a lot of free time n my hands, what style of music you producing???/
  5. Sal_Paradise

    Sal_Paradise
    640 posts
    Since Sep 13, 2009
    Double post
  6. Sal_Paradise

    Sal_Paradise
    640 posts
    Since Sep 13, 2009
    What do u recommend?
  7. Sal_Paradise

    Sal_Paradise
    640 posts
    Since Sep 13, 2009
  8. Sal_Paradise

    Sal_Paradise
    640 posts
    Since Sep 13, 2009
    Probably more techno the anything, as thats what I'm feeling more these days. But dunno really, I'm into all electronic music really
  9. Cee-Jay

    Cee-Jay
    2,993 posts
    Since Feb 23, 2003
  10. Sal_Paradise

    Sal_Paradise
    640 posts
    Since Sep 13, 2009
  11. mr meh

    mr meh
    565 posts
    Since Jan 10, 2011
    I've got a Focusrite Saffire Pro 14 firewire which was about £180, i hear those Apogee interfaces are good for macs tho. Depends how much you wanna spend really.
  12. Cee-Jay

    Cee-Jay
    2,993 posts
    Since Feb 23, 2003
    As above.
    Sorry didnt notice you'd chose a soundcard.
    I would recommend a lot of research as some will definitely run better than others, a lot are optimized for pc use where the Apogee is Mac only. Sounds really good and integrates into OSX so you can use the keyboard controls etc which can be handy. Ive had 3 or 4 different interfaces in the last few years inc a couple of Firewire cards but for me this is the best all round Mac interface. Its not just because its expensive either, the 4 or 5 people I know that own it do nothing but praise it both on sound quality, build and the integration.
  13. Rauwdouwer

    Rauwdouwer
    22 posts
    Since Dec 4, 2007
    It's never too late to start learning, mate...I do think you are going to try to learn too much!

    I think it's better to start producing with Ableton, with just a keyboard controller and a decent set of speakers (I even have my doubts if that is a good idea, because having a nice set of monitors is going to make you focus on the mix a lot, which is another thing that'll take your focus away from the actual music making)

    Think about everything you've got to learn:
    -You want to get comfortable using Ableton to produce
    -You are going to learn about sound design (which Vst's are you going to use btw?)
    -You are going to learn about meldoy, harmony etc.
    -You are going to learn about composition
    -You are going to learn about effects and mixing
    -You are going to learn how to use your controllers

    etc. etc.

    That's a lot of learning! I think it's best to do that in small steps, learn to walk before you can run! So get comfortable with ableton, even if it's just with a laptop and a pair of headphones...Just make whatever you feel comfortable with, try to learn something about sound design, music theory...But most of all: enjoy! And when you're sure there's something that's missing in your setup, then it's time to add something. By then you'll probably know exactly what it is that's missing.
  14. padillac

    padillac
    143 posts
    Since Sep 15, 2010
    Great post Rauwdouwer

    I like the Ableton suggestion as well. It's a great environment for experimenting because of all the different ways you can hook things up, but mostly for its general "hit record"-ability. You might also consider Reaper for similar reasons.
  15. djsyntax

    djsyntax
    859 posts
    Since Feb 16, 2009
    The most important thing to learn first is music theory. Whether you’re making jump up or ambient, you need fundamental theory under your belt, just basic scales etc. I’ve been making music for 7 years, only learning theory for the last 2, the improvement is through the roof. You cannot repeat cannot make good music without theory.
    I just have PC and good monitors, keyboard, that is all.
  16. mehta

    mehta
    2,986 posts
    Since Sep 20, 2007
    that's really not true - and I'm no slouch when it comes to that stuff (studied theory & composition with a very hardcore prof)

    it can be helpful but it's easy to get stuck thinking in terms of traditional western harmony
  17. imPray

    imPray
    192 posts
    Since Dec 26, 2010
    It depends. If you don't listen to a wide variety of music, you will probably make shit music forever without knowing how anything works, but lots of people can get by because they listen to so much music they can just wing it and know what sounds good. By listening to music, I mean really listening to music. Having something running in the background while you are concentrating on something else is not listening to music.
  18. Cee-Jay

    Cee-Jay
    2,993 posts
    Since Feb 23, 2003
    I think drum and bass(I mean proper stuff, not all this pop crap, Calibre etc) is more down to tricks/techniques rather than musical theory, and the only way you will learn the techniques is by playing with the software. I mean a lot of the best tunes were not near perfect but actually thats what made it so good.
    I'm not saying that the theory isnt required, just that I dont think it needs to be the first thing you learn. Learn the DAW and how to make some beats etc before worrying too much.
    I doubt much of this new pop crap was made with any musical knowledge, most has 2 or 3 notes.
  19. Sanguis Mortuum

    Sanguis Mortuum
    8,755 posts
    Since Aug 29, 2003
    :smashed:
  20. Kizza

    Kizza
    612 posts
    Since Oct 21, 2010
    You must have a really weird deffinition of what 'good music' is.
    Sabre, his music is pretty good, doesn't know the firs thing about theory.

    Add to this a whole list (probably the majority) of popular producers and you've just cornered yourself into only thinking a tiny portion of music is 'good music'... But I doubt you've done that, I think you just haven't thought about this before you've said it.. :spliff:
  21. djsyntax

    djsyntax
    859 posts
    Since Feb 16, 2009
    It’s all a matter of opinion is it not? You like Sabre and think his music “is pretty good” I happen to think Sabre’s music is absolute pants.

    I have a “pretty good” hunch that (probably the majority) of producers do know at least the very basics of theory. This can be demonstrated in many online tutorials and interviews with music’s best.

    I mean, why would you not want to learn the basics?

    I’m sure there is an abundance of well produced lovely music out there with no western or other theory applied, would be nice for you to enlighten me.

    You should cut down on the old pot you know; it kills brain cells and makes you think too much.:teeth:
  22. dentalis Yaaarrrgggg!!!

    dentalis
    5,077 posts
    Since Feb 28, 2006
    1. room treatment > any hardware
    2. stay off teh grid for your own sanity :teeth:
  23. Kizza

    Kizza
    612 posts
    Since Oct 21, 2010

    I'm not interested in enlightening you about anything. Mostly just for the sake of the OP because I wouldn't want his learning process be obstructed with crap.

    You reckon it's possible to think too much? This really explains a lot about you. You think because you've learned some basic chords this makes you better than Sabre? Or a shit tone of producers who kick ass on a daily basis and have a gigantic fan base? Think about that for a minute.. You're basically telling this guy that in order to make music that you think is 'good' he has to learn some theory? Oh no wait you don't like to think too much :laughing:
  24. djsyntax

    djsyntax
    859 posts
    Since Feb 16, 2009
    It’s not that you don’t want to enlighten me; it’s the fact that you can’t enlighten me because you’re talking complete and utter bollocks. Lol at “because I wouldn't want his learning process be obstructed with crap”.

    You mug.

    Me better then Sabre? Grow up you childish twat and construct a valid argument instead of blabbering shit.

    “Think about that for a minute.. You're basically telling this guy that in order to make music that you think is 'good' he has to learn some theory?”

    Well.....yea......nob. He doesn’t have to use it but as a whole it would help him learn, understand music better. How do you know what music I like and what I perceive as good music? You fucking don’t know because you’re a smart arse who tries to sound intelligent when you’re anything but.:laughing:
  25. Kizza

    Kizza
    612 posts
    Since Oct 21, 2010
    Hhahah. 3 people here disagree with you, 0 agree, Nuff said :zzz:
  26. djsyntax

    djsyntax
    859 posts
    Since Feb 16, 2009
    Dude, you don't have to know theory to make music:rolleyes2, but i strongly recommend you learn. Knowing it is better then not knowing it.
  27. monkey man

    monkey man
    6,032 posts
    Since Jun 15, 2001
    If you've already been using Ableton to DJ then I would stick with just that for the time being and just learn the basics of composing (Maschine is good but might be a bit overkill this early on in the game - you might lose focus).
  28. Ibunshi Mpc Pilot

    Ibunshi
    8,399 posts
    Since Jun 8, 2007
    as already said, you dont need to study anything, but it can be good to know (but then again, it can also prove bad to learn certain things)

    personally i do as i do with manuals, i skip them and dive in hands on and i dont read up until i actually get stuck = all focus put into actually doing things and if stuck, all focus is put into learning what i need to get over that hinder.

    the opposite of that is blindly reading and studying = more info that may end up being useless to you, and also less time for progress and music making.

    edit: a lot of people do that ^^ ..they follow the advice from someone they see as an authority, and then over do it and end up having nothing to show for what they have learnt, unless words on the web count as music.. but thats not just with music theory.. you can see it a lot with technical stuff too.. you have to compress, you have to split basses in 3 frequency layers, you have to do this or that, you need ths program, because someone they look up to does so.. and so people just reads and does things without actually having the experience of knowing exactly why they should or should not do things.. and you get that experience from doing things and facing problems... if you choose to try to walk on your own legs in the beginning, then when you get stuck, you will know why you need to do this or that.. you will not just do things because you read it somewhere.. as i see it, that can be just as bad as not having knowledge of something.
  29. decoy

    decoy
    29,255 posts
    Since Jun 16, 2001
    26 is fine

    Trentemoller didn't get famous until his early 30s, same goes for tons of producers :cool:

    as for music theory, its obviously not needed but it helps quite a lot imo.
  30. Ibunshi Mpc Pilot

    Ibunshi
    8,399 posts
    Since Jun 8, 2007
    trentemöller :love: